RARE BEAT - GARAGE ROCK AND PSYCHEDELIC
RUPERT'S PEOPLE
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Rupert's People was formed in 1967. Rod Lynton (real name Brosse) and Steve Brendell had been members of a North London band called The Extraverts who were said to be similar to The Kinks. The band split and Rod and Steve continued in Hard Edge although this did not last long. Ray Beverley joined on bass and the new group called, Sweet Feeling started to rehearse, mostly with Rod Lynton's songs. Les Fleurs de Lys were recruited to play on "The Reflections Of Charles Brown" as well as the excellent "Hold On". Peter Solley also joined for the sessions on organ. He was later in Procol Harum. Les Fleurs de Lys pulled out leaving the manager with a record deal, single but no band. However, the "virtual" band was christened Rupert's People. This was not the end of The Procol Harum connection though as "Whiter Shade of Pale" was released around the same time and, like the Rupert's People track, was based around a classical piece. "Reflections of Charles Brown" was a moderate success while "Whiter Shade of Pale" was a blockbuster. At this time it was decided to look to form a band called Rupert's People to capitalise on the success of the single. The former Sweet Feeling was viewed as the basis of this as Rod was already involved and did not sound unlike the Fleurs vocalist Chris Andrews. However, Sweet Feeling did not agree and so manager Howard Conder put together a band comprising Chris Andrews (who later used the name Tim Andrews to avoid confusion with Chris Andrews of "Yesterday Man" fame), Johnny Banks of The Merseybeats, Adrian Curtis who had been in The Knack and Tony Dangerfield who had been one of Lord Sutch's Savages as well as recording a single for PYE in 1964. However, this line-up did not last for long and Andrews was replaced by Paul Curtis (brother of Adrian and also former Knack member). This was also short-lived. Feeling he was losing a grip on the group, Conter fired all its members. The band severed relations with the manager and appointed Miles Copeland who was later to have immense success as manager of the Police. Rupert's People were said to have recorded a track called "Water to a Stone" in 1968/1969 said to be like "Born to be Wild". The track sounds unlike previous Rupert's People tracks, possibly due to being the hands of an untried producer, the Beatles' roadie Mal Evans! The band was coming to its natural conclusion. Copeland had brought in his younger brother Stewart Copeland on drums. He played on an unsuccessful French tour alongside John Tout and Terry Poole after Rod Lynton left the group. Tout later joined Renaissance including on their Northern Lights hit single. Steve Brendell worked for Apple Corps as well as John & Yoko's Yoko Films and played on the Imagine album.

MEMBERS:

Rod Lynton - guitar/vocals
John Tout - keyboards
Steve Brendell - drums

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A Prologue To A Magic World
Dream On My Mind
Belgium
Columbia DB 8278
Value: 110

A Prologue To A Magic World
Dream On My Mind
Norway
Columbia DB 8278
Value: 150

A Prologue To A Magic World
Dream On My Mind
Sweden
Columbia DB 8278
Value: 125

I Can Show You
I've Got The Love
France
Columbia CF 152
Value: 90

I Can Show You
I've Got The Love
Holland
Columbia DB 8362
Value: 100

Reflection sOf Charles Brown
Hold On
Brazil
Odeon 7I 3225
Value: 50
PROMO

Reflection sOf Charles Brown
Hold On
France
Columbia CF 119
Value: 90

Reflection sOf Charles Brown
Love / Opus 193
Germany
Columbia C 23623
Value: 50

Reflection sOf Charles Brown
A Prologue To A Magic World
Italy
Cinevox SC 1056
Value: 100

Reflection sOf Charles Brown
Hold On
Lebanon
Columbia
Value: 80
  

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